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Utilization of ozone to remove the methylene blue color from water: Kinetic study

Utilization of ozone to remove the methylene blue color from water: Kinetic study

Mohammed A. Al-Anber

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The methylene blue dye (MB+) is successfully removed from water by ozone.
  • The sonication is applied in a trail to enhance the oxidation process by ozone.
  • The kinetic behaviors of MB+ degradation by ozone follow both first-order and second-order reactions.
  • The semi-batch ozonation process provides better removal efficiency.

ABSTRACT

The blue color methylene blue dye (MB+) has been successfully removed from the water. The removal process was carried out by using the inorganic ozone (O3) in a semi-batch reactor. The operating variables of temperature (T = 20 – 60ºC), initial concentration of MB+ (Ci = 5, 10, 40, 60, 70 mg L-1) and pressure over the reactor vessel (p = 7, 8, 9 10 PSI) effect of decolorization process. The sonication was applied in a trail to enhance the oxidation process. The kinetic behaviors of MB+ degradation by the inorganic ozone molecules was studied by using pseudo-first order and second order to detect the oxidation mechanism of decolorization. The maximum percentage of decolorization (100%) is achieved by using low temperature (T = 20ºC), low initial concentration of MB+ (Ci = 10 mg L-1), and high pressure of ozone gas (p = 8 PSI). The equilibrium time can be achieved during 20 minutes by ozonation process. The decolorization reaction follows both the second order reaction mechanism (t £ 20 minutes) and first order after the equilibrium (t > 20 min). The semi-batch ozonation process provides better removal efficiency, high reaction rate and suitable to be used in the industry to remove methylene blue dye from industrial wastewater.

© 2018 Ababil Publishers. All rights reserved.

To cite this article: Al-Anber MA. Utilization of ozone to remove the methylene blue color from water: Kinetic study. Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:15-23.

To link this article: http://ababilpub.com/download/jdwp13-4/

Technical aspect of wastewater engineering for dark fermentative hydrogen production

Technical aspect of wastewater engineering for dark fermentative hydrogen production

Santhana Krishnan1,2, Mohd Fadhil Bin Din1*, Shazwin Mat Taib2, Hesam Kamyab3, Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan3 , Zularisam A. Wahid4, Puranjan Mishra4, Lakhveer Singh4, Mohd Nasrulah4, Supriyanaka Rana4, Nurakmal Ahmad Mustaffa5, Mohd Hafizal Ismail6, Christie Pie Yee7

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Dark fermentation is the fermentative conversion of organic substrate to biohydrogen.
  • Industrial wastewater is potential for hydrogen production due to availability, low-cost and biodegradability.
  • The configuration of fermenter along with subsequent processing defines the efficiency of a bioreactor.
  • Microbial electrolysis cells technique is an emerging technology for the augmentation of fermentation.
  • Two-stage fermentation is an alternative technology for higher yield.

ABSTRACT

Hydrogen is known to be an ideal alternative to fossil fuels because of its high energy density (142 MJ/kg) by mass and a clean combustion product. Using fermentative anaerobic bacteria to degrade biomass and produce renewable hydrogen is receiving a great attention. One of major obstacles of dark fermentation for high-yield hydrogen production is substrate inhibition while using dark fermentation effluent as the sole substrate. Dark fermentation is the fermentative conversion of organic substrate to biohydrogen. Industrial wastewaters can be used as a fermentative substrate for hydrogen production due to availability, low-cost and biodegradability. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) technique is an emerging technology for the augmentation of classical single stage fermentation. The configuration of the hydrogen fermenter along with subsequent downstream processing (hydrogen recovery and purification) is important to define the efficiency of a bioreactor producing hydrogen. Two-stage fermentation is a potential high-value solution for the valorization of waste biomass resources and probably an alternative technology for higher yield.

© 2018 Ababil Publishers. All rights reserved.

To cite this article: Krishnan S, Din MFB, Taib SM, Kamyab H, Chelliapan S, Wahid ZA, Mishra P, Singh L, Nasrulah M, Rana S, Mustaffa NA, Ismail MH, Yee CP. Technical aspect of wastewater engineering for dark fermentative hydrogen production. Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:11-14.

To link this article: http://ababilpub.com/download/jdwp13-3/

Proficiency improvement study on an inclined stepped solar still with different wick materials

Proficiency improvement study on an inclined stepped solar still with different wick materials

P. Ramesh Kumar1, K. Srithar2,*, T. Rajaseenivasan2, M. Vivar3, M. Fuentes4

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Inclined stepped solar still is tested with plain wick, wick with cotton, wick with coconut coir and sponge cubes.
  • Impact of water depths on solar still performance is analyzed.
  • Productivity of the solar still is considerably improved with the modifications.
  • The maximum energy efficiency of 48% and the exergy efficiency of 7% are reached.

ABSTRACT

Potential of an inclined stepped solar still is theoretically and experimentally
analyzed in this study. Solar still ability is improved by placing the materials
like plain wick, wick with cotton, wick with coconut coir and sponge cubes in
the solar still. These materials augment the distillate rate by increasing the
exposure area for evaporation. Initially, the stepped solar still is analyzed by
varying the water depth (2, 3 and 4 cm) in stepped tray. The optimum water
depth is selected and the further experiment is conducted with the wick
materials in the solar still. Energy and economic analysis is also performed in
this study. Result shows that the lowering the water depth and providing the
wick material improves the daily distillate output. The peak distillate of 4.65
kg/m2.day is collected in the stepped solar still contains wick with coconut coir
and sponges. It is about 32.9% higher compared to the conventional basin solar
still. The maximum energy efficiency of 48% and the exergy efficiency of 7%
are reached in the inclined stepped solar still. The minimum distilled water cost
of 0.034 $/kg in stepped solar still and 0.067 $/kg in conventional basin solar
still are achieved.

© 2018 Ababil Publishers. All rights reserved.

To cite this article: Kumar PR, Srithar K, Rajaseenivasan T, Vivar M, Fuentes M. Proficiency improvement study on an inclined stepped solar still with different wick materials. Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:3-10.

To link this article: http://ababilpub.com/download/jdwp13-2/

Mangrove zone migration as seawater level change

Mangrove zone migration as seawater level change

Daeng Siti Maimunah Ishak1,*, Santhana Krishnan2, Nahrizul Adib Kadri3

Mangroves are highly productive ecosystems that provide valued habitat for fish and shorebirds. Seawater characteristics play vital parts in mangrove life and associated physiological process. Changes in seawater level relates to the alteration of inundation level, distances, period of submergence and frequencies in a complex mangrove habitat. Ironically, mangrove lives in a nutrient-limited habitat but was classified as one of the highly productive ecosystem. Owing to the existence in marine environment and self-regenerating characteristics, mangrove maintain the nutrient cycles, salinity uptake, temperature stability, sedimentation processes and gaseous exchange from periodically seawater circulation. Despite the capability as self-regenerator, mangrove is a long-living and slow growing plant that cannot keep pace to seawater change when the intensity is too drastic. The drastic changes will induce the mass fatality, while the survival rate of mangrove trees would be reduced. Prolonged inundation will weaken root structures and expose seaward mangrove margin to vulnerabilities. In severe cases, mangrove sapling fails to survive in the affected perimeter and is replaced by other types of mangrove species…

© 2018 Ababil Publishers. All rights reserved.

To cite this article: Ishak DSM, Krishnan S, Adib Kadri N. Mangrove zone migration as seawater level change. Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:1-2.

To link this article: http://ababilpub.com/download/jdwp13-1/

JDWP Vol 13, Issue Dec, 2018

Journal of Desalination and Water Purification

Volume 13, Issue December 2018, Pages 1-23, Articles 1-4 (30 December 2018)

Editorial Board                                                     p. i

Acknowledgement to Reviewers                    p. i

Journal Information                                           p. ii

Contents                                                                p. iii

Articles                                                                   pp. 1-23

Ishak DSM, Krishnan S, Adib Kadri N.
Mangrove zone migration as seawater level change.
Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:1-2.

Kumar PR, Srithar K, Rajaseenivasan T, Vivar M, Fuentes M.
Proficiency improvement study on an inclined stepped solar still with different wick materials.
Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:3-10.

Krishnan S, Din MFB, Taib SM, Kamyab H, Chelliapan S, Wahid ZA, Mishra P, Singh L, Nasrulah M, Rana S, Mustaffa NA, Ismail MH, Yee CP.
Technical aspect of wastewater engineering for dark fermentative hydrogen production.
Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:11-14.

Al-Anber MA.
Utilization of ozone to remove the methylene blue color from water: Kinetic study.
Journal of Desalination and Water Purification 2018;13:15-23.

© 2018 Ababil Publishers. All rights reserved.

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